Include High Speed Running in Your Supplemental Training

Include High Speed Running in Your Supplemental Training

During matches, players cover high distances at multiple speeds. High speed running is a part of the game, but it is frequently not occurring during training. Players may need to augment their training with some high speed running to maintain match fitness.

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Using Periodization to Adjust Your Workouts for Greater Success

Using Periodization to Adjust Your Workouts for Greater Success

As an athlete, you know very well that your body responds to training. Having a proper training program is important. Many times people assume that more is better, that is, training more will produce better results. However, science says that this is not always the case.

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Vary Your Workouts to Maximize Gains

Vary Your Workouts to Maximize Gains

When playing soccer, you need to be able to compete for a long period of time at different intensity levels. While all of us would love to be able to sprint at top speed for the entire match, our bodies are not equipped to be able to do so. In addition, there are times when slowing down makes more sense tactically. Different length workouts improve different fitness components.

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Getting Fit by Going Fast

Getting Fit by Going Fast


Soccer is a series of high intensity runs, like sprinting, that are separated by some lower intensity activities, like jogging, walking, or standing. The best players are the ones that can continue to perform high intensity activities later in the game.  There have been numerous studies that investigate the speed and distance covered by soccer players. In a study I worked on, we found that English professional players cover on average over 11 km per match, with up to 1200 m (3/4 mile) covered while sprinting. Others found that teams that tend to win also tend to cover more sprinting distance in the last 15 minutes of the game than those who lost.

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Keeping Up with the Team

Keeping Up with the Team

As the fall moves on, most teams are in the middle of the season and have played a few matches. Preseason is past, and teams have settled into a somewhat regular cycle of matches, training, and days off. As a player, you probably fall into one of three broad categories. You are either 1) playing all or most minutes of your team’s matches; 2) playing some minutes or playing in some matches but not others; or 3) getting little to no match playing time. This article focuses on providing some thoughts and tips for players who find themselves in the categories of getting partial to no playing time.

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